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Edta

How does Edta work?

EDTA is a chemical that binds and holds on to (chelates) minerals and metals such as chromium, iron, lead, mercury, copper, aluminum, nickel, zinc, calcium, cobalt, manganese, and magnesium. When they are bound, they can't have any effects on the body and they are removed from the body.

Are there safety concerns?

EDTA is safe when used as a prescription medicine, as eye drops, and in small amounts as a preservative in foods. EDTA can cause abdominal cramps, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, headache, low blood pressure, skin problems, and fever.

It is UNSAFE to use more than 3 grams of EDTA per day, or to take it longer than 5 to 7 days. Too much can cause kidney damage, dangerously low calcium levels, and death.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: EDTA seems to be safe when used in food amounts. The safety of larger amounts is unknown.

Asthma: Nebulizer solutions containing disodium EDTA as a preservative can cause the breathing tubes to narrow in some people with asthma. The size of the dose determines the amount of the narrowing.

Heart rhythm problems: EDTA might make heart rhythm problems worse.

Diabetes: EDTA might interfere with blood sugar control because it can interact with insulin.

Low calcium levels in the blood (hypocalcemia): EDTA can decrease serum calcium levels, making hypocalcemia worse.

Low potassium (hypokalemia): EDTA can bind with potassium and increase the amount of potassium that is flushed out in the urine. This might cause potassium levels to drop too low, especially in people who have low levels to begin with. If you have this problem, don't use EDTA.

Low magnesium levels in the blood (hypomagnesemia): EDTA can bind with magnesium and increase the amount of magnesium that is flushed out in the urine. This might cause magnesium levels to drop too low, especially in people who have low levels to begin with. If you have this problem, don't use EDTA.

Liver problems and hepatitis: EDTA might make liver disease worse. Avoid using EDTA if you have a liver condition.

Kidney problems: EDTA can harm the kidney and might make kidney disease worse. EDTA doses should be reduced in patients with kidney disease. Avoid using EDTA if you have severe kidney disease or kidney failure.

Seizures (epilepsy): There is some concern that EDTA might increase the risk of seizure in people with epilepsy or in people who tend to have seizures. EDTA can cause severe decreases in blood levels of calcium, and this can cause a seizure.

Tuberculosis (TB): Tuberculosis is a lung infection that is caused by particular bacteria. Sometimes the body is able to "wall off" pockets of infection, making the infection inactive. The bacteria remain alive behind the wall of scar tissue, but they can't get out to cause illness or infect other people. This scar tissue frequently contains calcium. There is some concern that EDTA might be able to bind the calcium in the scar tissue, causing the "walls" to give way and release bacteria. Don't use EDTA if you have active TB or had TB in the past.

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

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Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.



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