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Enlarged Prostate (cont.)

What Are Enlarged Prostate Symptoms and Signs?

Many men with an enlarged prostate have no symptoms or signs. If symptoms are present, they commonly include

  • a weak stream of urine;
  • difficulty starting urination;
  • dribbling of urine, especially after urinating;
  • a sense of not fully emptying the bladder;
  • leaking of urine;
  • more frequent urination and a strong and sudden desire to urinate, especially at night; and
  • blood in the urine.

When Should Someone Call the Doctor About an Enlarged Prostate?

Urinary symptoms related to enlarging prostate initially affect the quality of life, and if no complications exist, as mentioned above (urinary infections, bladder stones, bleeding), the decision to treat is optional and is left to the patient. This means that if you don't feel bothered enough to take a medicine or undergo a procedure for it, you'll need to follow up with your doctor to ensure the symptoms are stable, and the bladder empties well. This can be assessed by prostate symptom questionnaires and a measure of the strength of the urinary stream (flow test) and residual urine in the bladder. If complications develop, however, or if the bladder starts holding increasing amounts of residual urine after urination, treatment should be started.

If you experience bladder pain or burning with urination, blood in the urine associated with fever/chills or nausea/vomiting, or if the prostate enlargement condition worsens and symptoms such as blood in the urine or lower back pain are present, consult a doctor immediately. If you cannot reach your doctor when these symptoms are present, seek evaluation at a hospital's emergency department.

For acute symptoms such as acute urinary retention (you feel uncomfortably full but cannot urinate), you should immediately go to the closest emergency medical facility for bladder drainage, usually with a catheter, which is a tube inserted into the bladder.

Men over 50 years of age should have their prostate checked annually by their physician even if they have no symptoms.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 8/7/2017
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Read What Your Physician is Reading on Medscape

Prostate Hyperplasia, Benign »

Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a noncancerous enlargement of the prostate gland that may restrict the flow of urine from the bladder.

Read More on Medscape Reference »


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