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Epa (Eicosapentaenoic Acid)

How does Epa (eicosapentaenoic Acid) work?

EPA can prevent the blood from clotting easily. These fatty acids also reduce pain and swelling.

Are there safety concerns?

EPA is LIKELY SAFE for most people when taken appropriately. It is usually well tolerated. Some people, however, can experience side effects such as nausea; diarrhea; heartburn; skin rash; itching; nosebleed; and joint, back, and muscle pain. Fish oils containing EPA can cause fishy taste, belching, nosebleeds, nausea, and loose stools. Taking EPA with meals can often decrease these side effects.

When used in amounts greater than 3 grams per day, EPA is POSSIBLY UNSAFE, and can thin the blood and increase the risk for bleeding.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about using of EPA during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Aspirin-sensitivity: If you are sensitive to aspirin, EPA might affect your breathing.

High blood pressure: EPA might lower blood pressure. In people who are already taking medications to lower their blood pressure, adding EPA might make blood pressure drop too low. If you have high blood pressure, discuss using EPA with your healthcare provider, before you start taking it.

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

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Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

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