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Eye Allergies (cont.)

Medications

Prescription eyedrops are generally very effective, and, because they are applied topically, eyedrops are usually free of many systemic side effects. Most eyedrops are used twice a day, and many can be used to prevent the allergic reaction in the first place. Some common allergy eyedrops include:

  • Nedocromil (Alocril)

  • Ketotifen (Zaditor)

  • Olopatadine (Patanol)

  • Azelastine (Optivar)

  • Pemirolast (Alamast)

  • Epinastine (Elestat)
Your ophthalmologist may prescribe cyclosporine A (Restasis). By helping to reduce the inflammatory and/or allergic reaction, cyclosporine A may help decrease your symptoms.

For more serious cases, topical ophthalmic corticosteroids can be used; however, many of the older corticosteroids are associated with ocular side effects with long-term use. The newer ophthalmic corticosteroids have a much lower risk of ocular side effects. Some common topical ophthalmic corticosteroids are:

  • Loteprednol 0.02% (Alrex)

  • Loteprednol 0.05% (Lotemax)

  • Prednisolone (AK-Pred)

  • Rimexolone (Vexol)

  • Medrysone (HMS)

  • Fluorometholone (FML, FML Forte, FML Liquifilm)

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