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Feverfew for Migraines


Topic Overview

Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium) is an herb that has been studied a lot for migraine prevention. Some small studies show that it may help prevent migraines in some people. But most experts think the benefits are still unproved.1

Feverfew is available as dried leaf powder, tablet, capsule, and tea. If you would like to try feverfew to help prevent your migraine headaches, it is important to find feverfew that has been standardized (which means you receive the same amount of active ingredient in every dose) with guaranteed potency.

Side effects of feverfew are usually mild but can include stomach upset and allergic reaction, such as a skin rash. People who chew on the feverfew leaves sometimes develop open sores (ulcers) in the mouth. Feverfew is not recommended for use by young children or by women who are pregnant or breast-feeding.

Be sure to tell your doctor before you take feverfew. Like any drug, it can interact with other medicines that you are taking or affect your health in ways you may not be aware of.

Related Information

References

Citations

  1. Pittler MH, Ernst E (2004). Feverfew for preventing migraine. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (1).

Credits

ByHealthwise Staff
Primary Medical ReviewerAnne C. Poinier, MD - Internal Medicine
Specialist Medical ReviewerColin Chalk, MD, CM, FRCPC - Neurology
Last RevisedJune 10, 2011

eMedicineHealth Medical Reference from Healthwise

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