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First Aid Kits (cont.)

What to Put in Your Household Kit

You can buy all items for your first aid kits at a well-stocked drug store. Ask the pharmacist for help in selecting items.

Home kit: A household first aid kit should include these items:

  • Adhesive tape
  • Anesthetic spray (Bactine) or lotion (Calamine, Campho-Phenique) - for itching rashes and insect bites
  • 4" x 4" sterile gauze pads - for covering and cleaning wounds, as a soft eye patch
  • 2", 3", and 4" Ace bandages - for wrapping sprained or strained joints, for wrapping gauze on to wounds, for wrapping on splints
  • Adhesive bandages (all sizes)
  • Diphenhydramine (Benadryl) - oral antihistamine for allergic reactions, itching rashes. Avoid topical antihistamine creams because they may worsen the rash in some people.
  • Exam gloves - for infection protection, and can be made into ice packs if filled with water and frozen
  • Polysporin antibiotic cream - to apply to simple wounds
  • Nonadhesive pads (Telfa) - for covering wounds and burns
  • Pocket mask for CPR
  • Resealable oven bag - as a container for contaminated articles, can become an ice pack
  • Safety pins (large and small) - for splinter removal and for securing triangular bandage sling
  • Scissors
  • Triangular bandage - as a sling, towel, tourniquet
  • Tweezers - for splinter or stinger or tick removal
  • In case of a medical or trauma related emergency, a list of family member's medical history, medications, doctors, insurance company, and contact persons should be readily available.
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