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Frostbite (cont.)

Frostbite Causes

Patient Comments

Your body works to stay alive first, and to stay functioning second.

  • In conditions of prolonged cold exposure, the body sends signals to the blood vessels in the arms and legs telling them to constrict (narrow). By slowing blood flow to the skin, the body is able to send more blood to the vital organs, supplying them with critical nutrients, while also preventing a further decrease in internal body temperature by exposing less blood to the outside cold.
  • As this process continues and the extremities (the parts farthest from the heart) become colder and colder, a condition called the hunter's response is initiated. The body's blood vessels are dilated (widened) for a period of time and then constricted again. Periods of dilatation are cycled with times of constriction in order to preserve as much function in the extremities as possible. However, when the brain senses that the person is in danger of hypothermia (when the body temperature drops significantly below 98.6 F [37 C]), it permanently constricts these blood vessels in order to prevent them from returning cold blood to the internal organs. When this happens, frostbite has begun.
  • Frostbite is caused by two different means: cell death at the time of exposure and further cell deterioration and death because of a lack of oxygen.
    • In the first, ice crystals form in the space outside of the cells. Water is lost from the cell's interior, and dehydration promotes the destruction of the cell.
    • In the second, the damaged lining of the blood vessels is the main culprit. As blood flow returns to the extremities upon rewarming, it finds that the blood vessels themselves are injured, also by the cold. The vessel walls become permiable and blood leaks out into the tissues. Blood flow is impeded and turbulent and small clots form in the smallest vessels of the extremities. Because of these blood flow problems, complicated interactions occur, and inflammation causes further tissue damage. This injury is the primary determinant of the amount of tissue damage that occurs in the end.
    • It is rare for the inside of the cells themselves to be frozen. This phenomenon is only seen in very rapid freezing injuries, such as those produced by frozen metals.

Frostbite Pictures

Picture of the Stages of Frostbite

Picture of the stages of frostbite

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 1/30/2014

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The eMedicineHealth doctors ask about Frostbite:

Frostbite - Causes

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From WebMD


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Frostbite »

Frostbite is a cold-related injury characterized by freezing of tissue.

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