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Frozen Shoulder (cont.)

Medical Treatment

As described above, the treatment of a frozen shoulder usually requires an aggressive combination of antiinflammatory medications, cortisone injection(s) into the shoulder, and physical therapy. Antiinflammatory medications include ibuprofen, naproxen (Naprosyn), diclofenac (Voltaren), and many others.

Cortisone medications can be used briefly, either orally (prednisone or prednisolone) or injected into the joint (Depo-Medrol, Kenalog, Celestone).

Next Steps

Regular, guided exercise, often with a physical therapist, is essential.

Follow-up

Once initial treatments have been initiated, the proper ongoing treatment is guided by the monitoring of the health-care professionals.

Prevention

Avoiding reinjury is essential to maintain optimal long-term function of the shoulder. A continued, balanced exercise regimen can help to reduce the risk of further shoulder injury.

Outlook

Depending on the duration and severity of the frozen shoulder, full recovery is anticipated. Resistant situations can, however, leave permanent loss of range of motion of the shoulder.

Medically reviewed by Aimee V. HachigianGould, MD; American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery


Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 9/8/2014

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