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Gamma Butyrolactone (Gbl)

How does Gamma Butyrolactone (gbl) work?

Gamma butyrolactone is converted in the body to gamma hydroxybutyrate (GHB) which affects several nerve pathways in the brain.

Are there safety concerns?

Gamma butyrolactone (GBL) is UNSAFE. It is illegal to manufacture or sell GBL.

Use of GBL, or the closely related gamma hydroxybutyrate (GHB) and butanediol (BD), has been linked to deaths and cases of serious side effects. These serious side effects include bowel incontinence, vomiting, mental changes, sedation, agitation, combativeness, memory loss, serious breathing and heart problems, fainting, seizures, coma, and death. The effects can be made worse by alcohol or narcotics (opiates such as morphine, heroin, and others). Long-term use may lead to withdrawal symptoms including insomnia, tremor, and anxiety.

GBL is UNSAFE and should not be taken by anyone. Certain people are at even more risk for side effects.

Do not take GBL if:
  • You are pregnant or breast-feeding.
  • You have epilepsy or a seizure disorder.
  • You have high blood pressure.
  • You have an irregular heartbeat.
  • You are scheduled for surgery in the next two weeks. GBL might cause excessive sedation if combined with medications used during and after surgery.

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

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Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.






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