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Heat Exhaustion (cont.)

Heat Exhaustion Diagnosis

The diagnosis of heat exhaustion is generally made after obtaining the patient's history and performing a physical exam. If the body temperature is less than 104 F or 40 C (105 F or 40.5 C in children) and the patient has symptoms of heat exhaustion, plus the patient was otherwise normal before being exposed to a hot environment, then the diagnosis can be made on clinical grounds. However, in some instances, blood and urine testing may be done to check for other causes or to detect certain abnormalities that may be associated with early signs of heat stroke, such as electrolyte abnormalities, rhabdomyolysis (muscle breakdown) and/or kidney damage. Other tests may also be ordered to exclude other diagnostic possibilities, depending on your doctor's evaluation.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 12/13/2013
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