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Hemophilia (cont.)

Hemophilia Causes

  • Men have only one X chromosome. If that chromosome carries the abnormal hemophilia gene, the man will have the disease hemophilia. Both hemophilia A and B are linked to the X chromosome, which means they primarily affect men.
  • Women have two X chromosomes. Even if one of the X chromosomes carries the defective gene, the normal gene on the other X chromosome will protect the woman from hemophilia. The gene does not affect them, but they carry it and pass it on to their children.
    • If a woman is a carrier, she has a 50% chance that her sons will have hemophilia. Likewise, she has a 50% chance that her daughters will be carriers of hemophilia. This assumes that the woman's partner is not a hemophiliac.
    • A man who has hemophilia has a 100% chance that his daughters will be carriers, since they must inherit the defective x chromosome from the father. His sons will not be affected if the mother is not a carrier.
  • The transmission of this gene to offspring accounts for most cases of hemophilia. The remaining cases occur from spontaneous changes in genes responsible for causing hemophilia.
Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 7/28/2014
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Hemophilia »

Hemophilia A(HA), which comprises approximately 80% of cases,is considered the classic form of hemophilia, and hemophilia B (HB) is termed Christmas disease.

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