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High Blood Sugar (Hyperglycemia) (cont.)

High Blood Sugar Treatment

  • Medication change: High blood sugars may be a sign that the person with diabetes needs to take medication, to change medications, or to change the way it is given (for example, additional insulin would be given, or a switch might be made from oral medication to injected medication).
  • Other illness: Other illnesses need to be diagnosed and treated if an illness is causing high blood sugar levels. Infection or illness may need to be treated in the hospital, where health professionals can adjust the plan of care.
  • Other Medications: A number of medications are available to help control blood sugar levels for people with type 2 diabetes. Insulin is also prescribed  for people with diabetes (all with type 1 diabetes and many with type 2 diabetes).

High Blood Sugar (Hyperglycemia) Follow-up

Patients with diabetes should have a hemoglobin A1c test performed every three months. Similar to a report card, this test provides feedback about the overall sugar levels for the past three months. People with diabetes should have a hemoglobin A1c level less than 7% at each clinical visit. Levels above 7% usually result from a person's consistent failure to:

  • follow a proper plan of diet,
  • take the necessary medication(s),
  • closely monitor blood glucose, or
  • exercise.

High Blood Sugar (Hyperglycemia) Prevention

  • Learn about managing diabetes.
  • Work with a certified diabetes educator. This person will have a CDE certification and may work in a diabetes education center or hospital.
  • Check blood sugar as directed by a CDE and doctor or nurse.
  • Know the symptoms and act quickly before blood sugars get out of control.
  • Follow a diabetes diet plan. Adjust the plan as needed.
  • Take medications for diabetes as directed by your healthcare professional.
  • Exercise daily.

Support Groups and Counseling for High Blood Sugar (Hyperglycemia)

You or family members may wish to join a support group with other people to share your experiences. The American Diabetes Association and the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation are both excellent resources. Your health care provider will have information about local groups in your area. The following groups also provide support:

American Association of Diabetes Educators
100 W Monroe, Suite 400
Chicago, IL 60603
(800) 338-3633

American Diabetes Association
1701 North Beauregard Street
Alexandria, VA 22311
(800) DIABETES (342-2383)
AskADA@diabetes.org

American Dietetic Association
120 South Riverside Plaza, Suite 2000
Chicago, IL 60606-6995
(800) 877-1600

Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International
120 Wall Street
New York, NY 10005-4001
(800) 533-CURE (2873)
info@jdrf.org

National Diabetes Education Program
One Diabetes Way
Bethesda, MD 20814-9692
(800) 438-5383
ndep@info.nih.gov

Medically reviewed by a Board-Certified Family Practice Physician

REFERENCE:

"Diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state in adults: Clinical features, evaluation, and diagnosis"

UpToDate.com


Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 3/2/2016

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Read What Your Physician is Reading on Medscape

Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic State »

Hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS) is one of two serious metabolic derangements that occurs in patients with diabetes mellitus and can be a life-threatening emergency.

Read More on Medscape Reference »


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