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Hives and Angioedema (cont.)

When to Seek Medical Care

Contact your health-care provider if you have hives or angioedema. After hearing your symptoms, he or she may want to see you for an office visit.

If you are having any of these symptoms along with hives or angioedema, you may be having an anaphylactic reaction. Go immediately to a hospital emergency department.

  • Difficulty with breathing or swallowing
  • Wheezing
  • Abdominal pain, vomiting, or diarrhea
  • General weakness
  • Feeling dizzy, light-headed, or faint

Other reasons to go to the emergency department:

  • Your hives or swelling do not improve after two to three days.
  • You continue getting new hives after two days.
  • Your symptoms do not get better with the treatment recommended by your health-care provider.

Do not drive yourself; if no one is available to take you right away, call 911 for emergency transport. While waiting for the ambulance to arrive, begin self-treatment.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 6/4/2014

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Read What Your Physician is Reading on Medscape

Angioedema »

Angioedema is a subcutaneous extension of urticaria, resulting in deep swelling within subcutaneous sites.

Read More on Medscape Reference »


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