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Hyphema (Bleeding in Eye)

Hyphema (Bleeding in Eye) Overview

Blunt trauma to the eye can cause bleeding in the front (or anterior chamber) of the eye between the cornea and the iris. This bleeding into the anterior chamber of the eye is called a hyphema.

The anterior chamber of the eye contains a clear liquid fluid called aqueous humor. The aqueous humor is secreted by the ciliary processes in the posterior chamber of the eye. The aqueous humor passes through the pupil into the anterior chamber. The aqueous humor provides important nutrition to the inner structures of the eye.

Hyphema Causes

Trauma to the eye may initially cause a small hyphema. More severe bleeding may follow in three to five days. This trauma is usually blunt or closed trauma, and it may be the result of an athletic injury from a flying object, a stick, a ball, or another player's elbow. Other causes include industrial accidents, falls, and fights.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 8/12/2015
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Bleeding in Eye (Subconjunctival Hemorrhage)

Subconjunctival Hemorrhage Symptoms

Most of the time, no symptoms are associated with a subconjunctival hemorrhage other than seeing blood over the white part of the eye.

  • Very rarely do people experience any pain when the hemorrhage begins. When the bleeding first occurs, you may experience a sense of fullness in the eye or under the lid.
  • The hemorrhage itself is an obvious, sharply outlined bright red area overlying the sclera. The entire white part of the eye may occasionally be covered by blood.
  • In a spontaneous subconjunctival hemorrhage, no blood will exit from the eye. If you blot the eye with a tissue, there should be no blood on the tissue.
  • The hemorrhage will appear larger within the first 24 hours after its onset and then will slowly decrease in size as the blood is absorbed.

Read What Your Physician is Reading on Medscape

Hyphema »

Postinjury accumulation of blood in the anterior chamber is one of the most challenging clinical problems encountered by the ophthalmologist.

Read More on Medscape Reference »


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