Image Collection: Noncancerous, Precancerous and Cancerous Tumors

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21. Picture of Lipoma 1

Picture of Lipoma (1 of 2)
Image Source: Fitzpatrick's Color Atlas & Synopsis of Clinical Dermatology Klaus Wolff, Richard Allen Johnson, Dick Suurmond Copyright 2005, 2001, 1997, 1993 by The McGraw-Hill Companies. All Rights reserved.
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Lipomas are single or multiple, benign subcutaneous tumors that are easily recognized because they are soft, rounded, or lobulated and movable against the overlying skin. Many lipomas are small but may also enlarge to 6 cm. They occur especially on the neck, trunk, and on the extremities but can occur anywhere on the body. Lipomas are composed of fat cells that have the same morphology as normal fat cells, and there is a connective tissue framework. Angiolipomas have a vascular component and may be tender in cold ambient temperature. These often require excision, whereas other lipomas should be excised only when considered disfiguring. Liposuction can also be performed when liposomas are soft and thus have only a minor connective tissue component.

Source: Color Atlas of Pediatric Dermatology Samuel Weinberg, Neil S. Prose, Leonard Kristal Copyright 2008, 1998, 1990, 1975, by the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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