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28. Picture of Syringoma

Picture of Syringoma
Image Source: Color Atlas of Pediatric Dermatology Samuel Weinberg, Neil S. Prose, Leonard Kristal Copyright 2008, 1998, 1990, 1975, by the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Syringoma: A benign (non-cancerous) skin tumor that derives from eccrine cells, specialized cells that are related to sweat glands. The skin lesions usually appear during puberty or adult life, and consist of small bumps one to three millimeters in diameter that form underneath the surface of the skin. The most frequent site is the eyelids and around the eyes, but other areas of the body can also be affected. There may be only one or a few lesions in a localized area, or numerous lesions covering a wide area. Syringomas more frequently affect women and do have an hereditary basis in some, but not all, cases. They are also associated with Down syndrome, Marfan syndrome, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

Treatment of syringomas can be a problem, depending on their number and location. One method that seems to be effective and creates minimal scarring is the use of a hair removal electric needle; another promising technique uses a CO2 laser.

Image Source: Color Atlas of Pediatric Dermatology Samuel Weinberg, Neil S. Prose, Leonard Kristal Copyright 2008, 1998, 1990, 1975, by the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

Text: MedTerms™ Medical Dictionary by MedicineNet, Inc.

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