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Immunization Schedule, Children (cont.)

Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine

HPV infection is considered to be the most common sexually transmitted infection (sexually transmitted disease, STD) in the U.S.

Although HPV infection may not cause symptoms, it is known that certain types of HPVs cause precancerous changes in the uterine cervix as well as cervical cancer. HPVs also cause genital warts.

  • The human papillomavirus vaccine is recommended in a three-dose schedule with the second and third doses administered two and six months after the first dose. Routine vaccination with HPV is recommended for females 11-12 years of age; the vaccination series can be started in females as young as 9; and a catch-up vaccination is recommended for females 13-26 years of age who have not been vaccinated previously or who have not completed the full vaccine series.

For More Information

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
1600 Clifton Rd
Atlanta, GA 30333
(800) 311-3435

American Academy of Pediatrics
141 Northwest Point Blvd
Elk Grove Village, IL 60007
(847) 434-4000

National Partnership for Immunization
121 North Washington Street, Suite 300
Alexandria, VA 22314
(703) 836-6110

Web Links


CDC, National Immunization Program, Vaccines for Children

American Academy of Pediatrics, Immunization Initiatives

Nemours Foundation, Your Child's Immunizations

MedlinePlus, Childhood Immunizations

Multimedia

2006 Recommended childhood immunization schedule. Courtesy of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
2006 Recommended childhood immunization schedule. Courtesy of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Catch-up immunizations schedules for children ages 4 months to 6 years and 7 through 18 years. Courtesy of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
"Catch-up" immunizations schedules for children ages 4 months to 6 years and 7 through 18 years. Courtesy of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Medically reviewed by Donald Lee, DO; Board Certified Family Practice

REFERENCES:

AAP. American Academy of Pediatrics. Committee on Infectious Diseases. Recommended childhood immunization schedule-United States, January-December 2002. Pediatrics. Jan 2002;109:162-4. [Medline].
AAP. American Academy of Pediatrics. Committee on Infectious Diseases. Recommended childhood immunization schedule-United States, January-December 2001. Pediatrics. Jan 2001;107(1):202-4. [Medline].
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Recommended childhood and adolescent immunization schedule - United States, 2006. MMWR [serial online]. 2006;54 (Nos. 54 & 52):Q1-Q4. [Full Text].


Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 8/6/2014
Medical Author:

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