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Immunization Schedule, Children (cont.)

Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccines

HPV infection is considered to be the most common sexually transmitted infection (sexually transmitted disease [STD]) in the U.S. There are about 79 million people currently infected with HPV, and there are about 14 million people newly infected each year.

Although HPV infection often does not cause symptoms, it is known that certain members of the HPV family of viruses cause precancerous changes of the cervix as well as cervical, vaginal, vulvar, and penile cancer. HPV is also associated with oral and anal cancer. HPV also causes genital warts in both genders.

There are two vaccines available for HPV protection. Cervarix is licensed only for females and is administered in three injections over a six-month timetable. Gardasil is approved for both male and females and is also administered in three injections over a six-month timetable. It is recommended to avoid using both varieties of vaccine in a single individual. Neither vaccine provides protection against other sexually transmitted infections.

For More Information on Childhood Immunizations

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
1600 Clifton Rd
Atlanta, GA 30333
800-311-3435

American Academy of Pediatrics
141 Northwest Point Blvd
Elk Grove Village, IL 60007
847-434-4000

CDC, National Immunization Program, Vaccines for Children

American Academy of Pediatrics, Immunization Initiatives

MedlinePlus, Childhood Immunizations

Childhood Immunization Schedule

2006 Recommended childhood immunization schedule. Courtesy of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
2006 Recommended childhood immunization schedule. Courtesy of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Catch-up immunizations schedules for children ages 4 months to 6 years and 7 through 18 years. Courtesy of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
"Catch-up" immunizations schedules for children ages 4 months to 6 years and 7 through 18 years. Courtesy of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

REFERENCES:

AAP. American Academy of Pediatrics. Committee on Infectious Diseases. Recommended childhood immunization schedule-United States, January-December 2002. Pediatrics 109 Jan 2002: 162-4. [Medline].

AAP. American Academy of Pediatrics. Committee on Infectious Diseases. Recommended childhood immunization schedule-United States, January-December 2001. Pediatrics 107.1 Jan 2001: 202-4. [Medline].
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Recommended childhood and adolescent immunization schedule - United States, 2006. MMWR [serial online]. 2006;54 (Nos. 54 & 52):Q1-Q4. [Full Text].


Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 11/10/2015

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