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Iodine

IN THIS ARTICLE

Are there any interactions with medications?



Medications for an overactive thyroid (Antithyroid drugs)
Interaction Rating: Major Do not take this combination.

Iodine can affect the thyroid. Taking iodine along with medications for an overactive thyroid might decrease the thyroid too much. Do not take iodine supplements if you are taking medications for an overactive thyroid.

Some of these medications include methenamine mandelate (Methimazole), methimazole (Tapazole), potassium iodide (Thyro-Block), and others.



Amiodarone (Cordarone)
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Amiodarone (Cordarone) contains iodine. Taking iodine supplements along with amiodarone (Cordarone) might cause too much iodine in the blood. Too much iodine in the blood can cause side effects that affect the thyroid.



Lithium
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Large amounts of iodine can decrease thyroid function. Lithium can increase iodine's effects on the thyroid. Taking iodine along with lithium might decrease the thyroid function too much. Do not take large amounts of iodine if you are taking lithium.



Medications for high blood pressure (ACE inhibitors)
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Some medications for high blood pressure might decrease how quickly the body gets rid of potassium. Most iodide supplements contain potassium. Taking potassium iodide along with some medications for high blood pressure might cause too much potassium in the body. Do not take potassium iodide if you are taking medications for high blood pressure.

Some medications for high blood pressure include captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), ramipril (Altace), and others.



Medications for high blood pressure (Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs))
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Some medications for high blood pressure might decrease how quickly the body gets rid of potassium. Most iodine supplements contain potassium. Taking potassium iodide along with some medications for high blood pressure might cause too much potassium in the body. Do not take potassium iodide if you are taking medications for high blood pressure.

The ARBs include losartan (Cozaar), valsartan (Diovan), irbesartan (Avapro), candesartan (Atacand), telmisartan (Micardis), and eprosartan (Teveten).



Water pills (Potassium-sparing diuretics)
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Most iodine supplements contain potassium. Some "water pills" might also increase potassium in the body. Taking potassium iodide along with some "water pills" might cause too much potassium to be in the body. Do not take potassium iodide if you are taking "water pills" that increase potassium in the body.

Some "water pills" that increase potassium in the body include spironolactone (Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium), and amiloride (Midamor).

Dosing considerations for Iodine.

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY MOUTH:
  • For radiation emergencies: potassium iodide (KI) should be taken just prior to, or as soon as possible after, exposure. Radiation is most harmful to pregnant or breastfeeding women and children, so KI is dosed according to amount of radiation exposure and age. Radiation exposure is measured in centigrays (cGy). For infants, babies, children, adolescents, and pregnant or breastfeeding women, KI is given if radiation exposure is 5 centigrays (cGy) or more. Tablets can be crushed and mixed with fruit juice, jam, milk, etc.
    • For birth through 1 month, the dose is 16 mg of KI;
    • For babies and children over 1 month through 3 years, 32 mg;
    • For children 3 to 12 years, 65 mg;
    • For adolescents 12 through 18 years, 65 mg or 120 mg if the adolescent is approaching adult size;
    • For pregnant or breastfeeding women, 120 mg.
    • For adults 18 to 40 years with exposure to 10 cGy or more, 130 mg of KI is given.
    • For adults over 40 years with exposure to 500 cGy or more, 130 mg of KI is given.
The National Institute of Medicine has set Adequate Intake (AI) of iodine for infants: 0 to 6 months, 110 mcg/day; 7 to 12 months, 130 mcg/day.

For children and adults, Recommended Dietary Amounts (RDA) have been set: children 1 to 8 years, 90 mcg/day; 9 to 13 years, 120 mcg/day; people age 14 and older, 150 mcg/day. For pregnant women, the RDA is 209 mcg/day, and breastfeeding women, 290 mcg/day.

Tolerable Upper Intake Levels (UL), the highest level of intake that is not likely to cause unwanted side effects, for iodine intake have been set: children 1 to 3 years, 200 mcg/day; 4 to 8 years, 300 mcg/day; 9 to 13 years, 600 mcg/day; 14 to 18 years (including pregnancy and breastfeeding), 900 mcg/day. For adults older than age 19 including pregnant and breastfeeding women, the Tolerable Upper Intake Level is 1100 mcg/day.

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

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Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.





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