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Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (cont.)

Pictures of Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis

Media file 1: Active pauciarticular arthritis. Notice the swelling above the knee. Image courtesy of Barry L. Myones, MD.
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Media type: Photo

Media file 2: Active polyarticular arthritis. Notice the swelling of only certain finger joints. Image courtesy of Barry L. Myones, MD.
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Media type: Photo

Media file 3: Wrist x-rays of active polyarticular arthritis (same person as Image 2). X-ray shows severe loss of cartilage, bone erosion, and joint fixation and narrowing. Image courtesy of Barry L. Myones, MD.
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Media type: X-RAY

Media file 4: Close-up of the affected joints in a person with active polyarticular arthritis (same person shown in Images 2 and 3). Image courtesy of Barry L. Myones, MD.
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Media file 5: Inactive polyarticular arthritis. Long-term symptoms of polyarticular disease include partial joint dislocation (subluxation) of both wrists and thumbs, joint contractures, boney overgrowth, and finger deformities (for example, swan-neck or boutonniere deformities). Image courtesy of Barry L. Myones, MD.
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Media type: Photo

Media file 6: Hand and wrist X-rays of inactive polyarticular arthritis (same person shown in Image 5). Long-term symptoms of polyarticular disease include decreased bone density around joints, bone fusion, accelerated bone age, narrowed joint spaces, boutonniere deformities (at left third and fourth interphalangeal joints), and partial dislocation (subluxation) of joints. Image courtesy of Barry L. Myones, MD.
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Media type: X-RAY

Media file 7: Eye inflammation (chronic anterior uveitis). Note the weblike attachments of the pupillary margin to the anterior lens capsule of the right eye. This patient has a positive antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) and initially had a pauciarticular course of her arthritis. She now has polyarticular involvement but no active uveitis. Image courtesy of Barry L. Myones, MD.
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Media file 8: One set of suggested algorithms for the treatment of patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). This treatment is not standardized. Treatment of JRA is based on experience and observation, and it can be controversial.
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Media type: Illustration

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Read What Your Physician is Reading on Medscape

Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis »

Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) is not a single disease.

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