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Kidney Infection (cont.)

Kidney Infection Medications

As mentioned above, antibiotics are the most important part of treatment of kidney and urinary tract infections. Several types of antibiotics are available and used to treat kidney infection. The choice depends on specific situations, clinical setting, tolerance, allergies, and ability to take oral medications.

Some of the common antibiotics used include sulfanamides (trimethoprim-sulfomethoxazole), quinolones (ciprofloxacin, levafloxacin), cephalosporins, newer generation penicillins, and nitrofurantoin. The doctor diagnosing the kidney infection can determine what is the most appropriate in a given situation.

Kidney Infection Follow-up

Similar to any infection, a routine follow-up with the physician treating the kidney infection is important to assure that therapy has been effective. More immediate follow up may be necessary if the symptoms of the infection do not improve after a few days of antibiotics and supportive care. In such cases, further investigation may be necessary to rule out a complicated kidney infection and to assure that the organism causing the infection is sensitive to the prescribed antibiotics.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 12/29/2015

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Read What Your Physician is Reading on Medscape

Pyelonephritis, Acute »

Acute pyelonephritis is a potentially organ- and/or life-threatening infection that characteristically causes some scarring of the kidney with each infection and may lead to significant damage to the kidney (any given episode), kidney failure, abscess formation (eg, nephric, perinephric), sepsis, or sepsis syndrome/shock/multiorgan system failure.

Read More on Medscape Reference »


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