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Meniere's Disease (cont.)

What Increases Your Risk

Because the cause of Ménière's disease is unknown, it is difficult to predict who will get the condition. You may be at higher risk for getting Ménière's disease if you have:

When To Call a Doctor

Call or other emergency services immediately if you have vertigo (a spinning sensation) and:

  • You passed out (lost consciousness).
  • You have symptoms of a stroke, such as:
    • Sudden numbness, tingling, weakness, or loss of movement in your face, arm, or leg, especially on only one side of your body.
    • Sudden vision changes.
    • Sudden trouble speaking.
    • Sudden confusion or trouble understanding simple statements.
    • Sudden problems with walking or balance.
    • A sudden, severe headache that is different from past headaches.
  • You have chest pain.
  • You have a headache, especially if you also have a stiff neck and fever.
  • You have sudden hearing loss.
  • You have numbness or tingling that does not go away, anywhere on your body.
  • You have vomiting that doesn't stop.
  • You had a recent head injury.

Call your doctor now or seek immediate care if:

  • You have an attack of vertigo that is different from those you have had before or from what your doctor told you to expect.
  • You need medicine to control nausea and vomiting caused by severe vertigo.

If you have been diagnosed with Ménière's disease, watch closely for changes in your health. And be sure to contact your doctor if:

  • You have frequent or severe attacks of vertigo that interfere with your normal activities.
  • You do not get better as expected.
  • You have any new symptoms.
  • You have problems with your medicine.
  • You have questions or concerns.

Watchful Waiting

Watchful waiting is a period of time during which you and your doctor observe your symptoms or condition without using medical treatment. Watchful waiting is not appropriate if you think you may have Ménière's disease—see a doctor right away. Attacks of Ménière's disease can cause permanent hearing loss. Prompt diagnosis and steps to prevent further attacks may reduce both the discomfort of attacks and the risk of hearing loss.

Who To See

Health professionals who can diagnose and treat Ménière's disease include:

You may be referred to a specialist:

To prepare for your appointment, see the topic Making the Most of Your Appointment.

eMedicineHealth Medical Reference from Healthwise

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