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Mumps


Topic Overview

What is mumps?

Mumps is a contagious viral infection that can cause painful swelling of the salivary glands, especially the parotid glandsClick here to see an illustration. (between the ear and the jaw). Some people with mumps won't have gland swelling. They may feel like they have a bad cold or the flu instead.

Mumps usually goes away on its own in about 10 days. But in some cases it can cause complications that affect the brain (meningitis), the testicles (orchitis), the ovaries (oophoritis), or the pancreas (pancreatitis).

The mumps vaccine protects against the illness. This vaccine is part of the MMR (measles, mumps, and rubella) and MMRV (measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella [chickenpox]) vaccines. Most children get the vaccine as part of their regular shots. Before the mumps vaccine existed, mumps was a common childhood disease in the United States and Canada.

What causes mumps?

Mumps is spread when an infected person coughs or sneezes near you or shares food or drinks.

You can spread the virus 1 to 2 days before and for 5 to 9 days after symptoms start.

What are the symptoms?

Symptoms may include:

  • Swelling and pain in the jaw. One or both cheeks may look swollen.
  • Fever.
  • Headache, earache, sore throat, and pain when you swallow or open your mouth.
  • Pain when you eat sour foods or drink sour liquids, such as citrus fruit or juice.
  • Tiredness, with aching in the muscles and joints.
  • Poor appetite and vomiting.

It usually takes 2 to 3 weeks to get symptoms after you have been exposed to the virus. This is called the incubation period. Some people who are infected with the mumps virus don't have any symptoms.

If you have more serious symptoms, such as a stiff neck or a severe headache, painful testicles, or severe belly pain, call your doctor right away.

How is mumps diagnosed?

Mumps is usually diagnosed based on symptoms and a history of exposure to the virus. If needed, a blood test can be done to confirm that you have mumps and rule out other illnesses.

The mumps virus can be identified with a viral culture using a sample of urine, saliva, or cerebrospinal fluid. These tests are rarely done.

If you think that you or your child has mumps, be sure to call your doctor so that he or she can report it to the local health department. The health department needs to record all cases of this illness.

How is it treated?

In most cases, people recover from mumps with rest and care at home. In complicated cases, a hospital stay may be required.

If you or your child has mumps:

  • Use acetaminophen for fever or headache. Follow all instructions on the label. If you give medicine to a baby, follow your doctor's advice about what amount to give. Do not give aspirin to anyone younger than 20 because of the risk of Reye syndrome.
  • Use ice or a heat pack (whichever feels better) on swollen, painful areas. Put a thin towel under the ice or heat to protect the skin.
  • Drink extra fluids to help reduce fever and prevent dehydration.
  • Suck on ice chips or flavored ice pops. Eat soft foods that don't require chewing.
  • Don't eat sour foods or drink sour liquids.

Anyone who has mumps should stay out of school, day care, work, and public places until 5 days after the salivary glands first start to swell.1

In general, you don't need to separate the sick person from the rest of the family. By the time mumps is diagnosed, most household members have already been exposed.

Why is it important to prevent mumps?

Getting your child vaccinated is important, because mumps can sometimes cause serious problems. It's also important because mumps is a contagious disease, and outbreaks can easily occur.

False claims in the news have made some parents concerned about a link between autism and vaccines. But studies have found no link between them.2

eMedicineHealth Medical Reference from Healthwise

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