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Oral Herpes (cont.)

What Types of Doctors Treat Oral Herpes?

Some patients will not require a physician to treat them. However, pediatricians, primary-care doctors, emergency-medicine doctors, dentists, dermatologists occasionally infectious-disease doctors treat HSV-1 infections.

Is Follow-up Necessary After Treatment of Oral Herpes?

Drink plenty of fluids.

  • Use pain medications as instructed by the doctor.
  • Use medications to control fever.
  • Watch for signs and symptoms of dehydration.
  • If any signs of dehydration develop, seek medical care immediately.

Is It Possible to Prevent Oral Herpes (HSV-1, Herpes Simplex Virus-1)?

Patient Comments

To reduce the chance of acquiring HSV-1, avoid touching saliva, skin, or mucous membranes of people who have HSV-1 lesions. Prevention of genital HSV may be accomplished by latex condoms, but protection is never 100%. Spermicides do not protect against HSV. Some clinicians recommend using dental dams (small latex squares) during oral sex, but like condoms, they are not 100% protective.

Is There an Oral Herpes Vaccine?

An experimental vaccine against HSV-1 is being tested in England that may be marketed in the near future. Currently, there is no cure for HSV-1.

What Is the Prognosis of Oral Herpes (HSV-1, Herpes Simplex Virus-1)?

The sores and symptoms of oral herpes usually completely disappear in two to three weeks with no scarring. However, the sores may reappear under certain stressful situations. Rarely, some complications develop in a few individuals:

Oral Herpes (HSV-1, Herpes Simplex Virus-1) Pictures

Figure 1: A Tzanck smear shows enlarged nuclei that occupy most of the cell.

A herpes Tzanck smear shows enlarged nuclei that occupy most of the cell. Photo: NIH

Figure 2: HSV-1 lesions (sores) on lips


Oral herpes: Clusters of blisters erupt on the lips, tongue, and inside the mouth. Most people have been infected by at least one herpes subtype before adulthood.

REFERENCES:

"Herpes Simplex." American Academy of Dermatology. <https://www.aad.org/dermatology-a-to-z/diseases-and-treatments/e---h/herpes-simplex>.

Lacker, A., H. Kessler, C. Walch, et al. "Early and Reliable Detection of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 and Varicella Zoster Virus DNA's in Oral Fluid of Patients With Idiopathic Peripheral Facial Nerve Palsy: Decision Support Regarding Antiviral Treatment?" J. Med. Virol. 82 (2010): 1582-1585.

Pinninti, Swetha G. "Pediatric Herpes Simplex Virus Infection." Medscape.com. Apr. 10, 2013. <http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/964866-overview>.

Salvaggio, Michelle R. "Herpes Simplex." Medscape.com. Sept. 18, 2015. <http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/218580-overview>.


Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 5/19/2016

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Patient Comments & Reviews

The eMedicineHealth doctors ask about Oral Herpes:

Oral Herpes - How Did You Manage?

How do you manage your oral herpes (herpes simplex virus) infection?

Oral Herpes - Symptoms

What were the symptoms and signs of your oral herpes?

Oral Herpes - Treatment

What was the treatment for your oral herpes?

Oral Herpes - Prevention

What prevention measures do you use to avoid getting oral herpes?

Oral Herpes - Experience

Please describe your experience with oral herpes.


Read What Your Physician is Reading on Medscape

Herpes Simplex Encephalitis »

The human herpesvirus (HHV) family includes 2 clinically important strains, also known as herpes simplex virus (HSV).

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