Font Size
A
A
A
2
...

Osteoporosis (cont.)

Osteoporosis Causes

Osteoporosis occurs when there is an imbalance between new bone formation and old bone resorption. The body may fail to form enough new bone, or too much old bone may be reabsorbed, or both. Two essential minerals for normal bone formation are calcium and phosphate. Throughout youth, the body uses these minerals to produce bones. Calcium is essential for proper functioning of the heart, brain, and other organs. To keep those critical organs functioning, the body reabsorbs calcium that is stored in the bones to maintain blood calcium levels. If calcium intake is not sufficient or if the body does not absorb enough calcium from the diet, bone production and bone tissue may suffer. Thus, the bones may become weaker, resulting in brittle and fragile bones that can break easily.

Usually, the loss of bone occurs over an extended period of years. Often, a person will sustain a fracture before becoming aware that the disease is present. By then, the disease may be in its advanced stages and damage may be serious.

The leading cause of osteoporosis is a lack of certain hormones, particularly estrogen in women and androgen in men. Women, especially those older than 60 years of age, are frequently diagnosed with the disease. Menopause is accompanied by lower estrogen levels and increases a woman's risk for osteoporosis. Other factors that may contribute to bone loss in this age group include inadequate intake of calcium and vitamin D, lack of weight-bearing exercise, and other age-related changes in endocrine functions (in addition to lack of estrogen).

Other conditions that may lead to osteoporosis include overuse of corticosteroids (Cushing syndrome), thyroid problems, lack of muscle use, bone cancer, certain genetic disorders, use of certain medications, and problems such as low calcium in the diet.

  • The following are risk factors for osteoporosis:
    • Women are at a greater risk than men, especially women who are thin or have a small frame, as are those of advanced age.
    • Women who are white or Asian, especially those with a family member with osteoporosis, have a greater risk of developing osteoporosis than other women.
    • Women who are postmenopausal, including those who have had early or surgically induced menopause, or abnormal or absence of menstrual periods are at greater risk.
    • Cigarette smoking, eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa or bulimia, low amounts of calcium in the diet, heavy alcohol consumption, inactive lifestyle, and use of certain medications, such as corticosteroids and anticonvulsants, are also risk factors.
    • Rheumatoid arthritis itself is a risk factor for osteoporosis.
    • Having a parent that has/had osteoporosis is a risk factor for the offspring.

Must Read Articles Related to Osteoporosis

Bone Mineral Density Tests
Bone Mineral Density Tests Osteoporosis (or porous bone) is a disease in which bones become weak and are more likely to break. Bone mineral density tests check the strength and solidness ...learn more >>
Fall Prevention and Osteoporosis
Fall Prevention and Osteoporosis Osteoporosis (or porous bone) is a disease in which bones become less dense, resulting in weak bones that are more likely to break. Without prevention or treatm...learn more >>
Hormone Replacement and Osteoporosis
Hormone Replacement and Osteoporosis Hormones are produced by glands in our bodies. They are chemicals that have specific effects on different parts of our bodies. For example, the ovaries produce ...learn more >>

Patient Comments & Reviews

The eMedicineHealth doctors ask about Osteoporosis:

Osteoporosis - Symptoms

The symptoms of osteoporosis can vary greatly from patient to patient. What were your symptoms at the onset of your disease?

Osteoporosis - Treatment

Please describe how you're treating your osteoporosis.





Read What Your Physician is Reading on Medscape

Osteoporosis »

Osteoporosis is a systemic skeletal disorder characterized by decreased bone mass and deterioration of bony microarchitecture.

Read More on Medscape Reference »


Medical Dictionary