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Ovarian Cancer (cont.)

How Can I Prevent Ovarian Cancer?

Any factor that prevents ovulation (the release of an egg) seems to decrease the risk of ovarian cancer.

  • Taking oral contraceptives (birth control pills)
  • Pregnancy
  • Starting menstrual cycles later in adolescence
  • Early menopause
  • Tubal ligation (having the tubes tied)

a woman has a strong family history of ovarian cancer or she knows that she has the BRCA1 gene mutation or HNPCC (Lynch syndrome II), she may want to talk to her health care provider about the possibility of having her ovaries removed after childbearing or after age 35-40 years.

Many of the screening tests available for ovarian cancer do not detect early disease. In fact, the US Preventive Services Task Force does not recommend routine screening because there is no evidence that screening reduces the severity of illness or number of deaths due to ovarian cancer. By itself, each single testing method is imperfect. When used together, however, these tests may contribute to earlier diagnosis.

What Is the Prognosis for Ovarian Cancer?

Patient Comments

The graph represents the 5-year survival rate for each stage of ovarian cancer. The percentage of survivors is divided by stage subtype (A, B, or C), except for stage IV, which is not divided. These data are from the International Federation for Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO), which publishes a report of treatment results submitted from around the world for a variety of cancers affecting women.

Ovarian Cancer Statistics

The graph represents the 5-year survival rate for each stage of ovarian cancer. The percentage of survivors is divided by stage subtype (A, B, or C), except for stage IV, which is not divided. These data are from the International Federation for Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO), which publishes a report of treatment results submitted from around the world for a variety of cancers affecting women.
The graph represents the 5-year survival rate for each stage of ovarian cancer. The percentage of survivors is divided by stage subtype (A, B, or C), except for stage IV, which is not divided. These data are from the International Federation for Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO), which publishes a report of treatment results submitted from around the world for a variety of cancers affecting women. Click to view larger image.

Medically reviewed by Jay B. Zatzkin, MD; American Board of Internal Medicine with subspecialty in Medical Oncology

REFERENCE:

"Epithelial carcinoma of the ovary, fallopian tube, and peritoneum: Clinical features and diagnosis"
UpToDate.com


Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 11/30/2016
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Patient Comments & Reviews

The eMedicineHealth doctors ask about Ovarian Cancer:

Ovarian Cancer - Diagnosis

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Ovarian Cancer - Experience

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Ovarian Cancer - Symptoms and Signs

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Ovarian Cancer - Stages

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Ovarian Cancer - Prognosis

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Read What Your Physician is Reading on Medscape

Ovarian Cancer »

Ovarian cancer is the most common cause of cancer death from gynecologic tumors in the United States.

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