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Pancoast Tumor (cont.)

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A 53-year-old man with a 50-pack-per-year history of smoking began experiencing upper back pain for several weeks. The chest X-ray film shows asymmetry of the lung apexes (superior sulcus). The right apex is less transparent than the left. When the image is enlarged, the partially destroyed second and third right ribs of the back near the costovertebral junction can be seen.
A 53-year-old man with a 50-pack-per-year history of smoking began experiencing upper back pain for several weeks. The chest X-ray film shows asymmetry of the lung apexes (superior sulcus). The right apex is less transparent than the left. When the image is enlarged, the partially destroyed second and third right ribs of the back near the costovertebral junction can be seen.
Axial nonenhanced CT image of the upper rear spine demonstrates a soft tissue mass destroying the vertebra on the right and the right rear elements, including the pedicle and part of the posterior spinous process.
Axial nonenhanced CT image of the upper rear spine demonstrates a soft tissue mass destroying the vertebra on the right and the right rear elements, including the pedicle and part of the posterior spinous process.
Sagittal gradient-echo T2-weighted MRI demonstrates a soft tissue mass involving C7, T1, and T2, with collapse of the vertebrae and moderate cord compression.
Sagittal gradient-echo T2-weighted MRI demonstrates a soft tissue mass involving C7, T1, and T2, with collapse of the vertebrae and moderate cord compression.

Medically reviewed by Jay B. Zatzkin, MD; American Board of Internal Medicine with subspecialty in Medical Oncology


Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 6/10/2014
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Pancoast Tumor »

In 1932, Pancoast defined a superior pulmonary sulcus tumor as a mass growing at the thoracic inlet that produces a constant and characteristic clinical presentation of pain in an eighth cervical or first and second thoracic trunk distribution.

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