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Parkinson's Disease (cont.)

Other Treatment

Physical therapy, speech and language therapy, and occupational therapy can all be helpful for people who have Parkinson's disease.

Several nutritional therapies have been suggested as treatments for Parkinson's disease. None of these has been proved effective. But it is important to maintain general health and to eat a balanced diet.

Before trying a complementary treatment, such as a special diet, talk with your doctor about the safety and potential side effects of the treatment. Talking with your doctor can help you both decide whether a treatment is safe and effective. Complementary treatments should not replace the use of drugs to treat Parkinson's disease if you are a candidate for treatment with these drugs.

Depression that does not respond to drugs may improve with electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). ECT can also improve movement for a short period of time, though the reason for this improvement is not understood.

In March 2007 the National Institutes of Health (NIH) National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) announced that they are starting a large clinical trial to see if the nutritional supplement creatine can slow the progression of Parkinson's disease. Results from this study are expected in 5 to 7 years.

eMedicineHealth Medical Reference from Healthwise

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