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Personal Protective Equipment (cont.)

Pictures of Personal Protective Equipment

Rescuer wearing level A protection. Note that he is encapsulated completely with a self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA). This type of suit provides the highest degree of both skin and breathing protection and is appropriate for wear in a hot zone that presents an immediate danger to life and health. The garment severely limits communication and provides a great deal of heat stress. Photo credit: Tom Blackwell, MD.
Rescuer wearing level A protection. Note that he is encapsulated completely with a self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA). This type of suit provides the highest degree of both skin and breathing protection and is appropriate for wear in a hot zone that presents an immediate danger to life and health. The garment severely limits communication and provides a great deal of heat stress. Photo credit: Tom Blackwell, MD. Click to view larger image.

Rescuer wearing level A protection, rear view. By definition, level A protection incorporates either a self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA, shown here) or a supplied-air respirator (SAR). The wearer is encapsulated completely. Photo credit: Tom Blackwell, MD.
Rescuer wearing level A protection, rear view. By definition, level A protection incorporates either a self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA, shown here) or a supplied-air respirator (SAR). The wearer is encapsulated completely. Photo credit: Tom Blackwell, MD. Click to view larger image.

Rescuer wearing level A protection, rear view. By definition, level A protection incorporates either a self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA, shown here) or a supplied-air respirator (SAR). The wearer is encapsulated completely. Photo credit: Tom Blackwell, MD.
Rescuer wearing level A protection, rear view. By definition, level A protection incorporates either a self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA, shown here) or a supplied-air respirator (SAR). The wearer is encapsulated completely. Photo credit: Tom Blackwell, MD. Click to view larger image.

Rescuer wearing level C protection. The skin is protected the same as with level B, but the rescuer now is breathing filtered air from a powered air-purifying respirator (PAPR) rather than supplied air from a tank. Because it avoids the weight and complexity of a self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) system, Level C protection is much easier to wear and causes less heat stress. Level C protection is appropriate for most activities in the warm zone, unless droplet and/or vapor levels are very high. Photo credit: Tom Blackwell, MD.
Rescuer wearing level C protection. The skin is protected the same as with level B, but the rescuer now is breathing filtered air from a powered air-purifying respirator (PAPR) rather than supplied air from a tank. Because it avoids the weight and complexity of a self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) system, Level C protection is much easier to wear and causes less heat stress. Level C protection is appropriate for most activities in the warm zone, unless droplet and/or vapor levels are very high. Photo credit: Tom Blackwell, MD. Click to view larger image.

Chemical Terrorism Agents and Syndromes. Signs and symptoms to watch for. Chart courtesy of North Carolina Statewide Program for Infection Control and Epidemiology (SPICE), copyright University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Chemical Terrorism Agents and Syndromes. Signs and symptoms to watch for. Chart courtesy of North Carolina Statewide Program for Infection Control and Epidemiology (SPICE), copyright University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.Click to view larger image.

Bioterrorist Agents. Signs and symptoms to watch for. Chart courtesy of North Carolina Statewide Program for Infection Control and Epidemiology (SPICE), copyright University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Bioterrorist Agents. Signs and symptoms to watch for. Chart courtesy of North Carolina Statewide Program for Infection Control and Epidemiology (SPICE), copyright University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Click to view larger image.

Medically reviwed by Robert Cox, MD; American Board of Internal Medicine with subspecialty in Infectious Disease


Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 9/11/2014
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CBRNE - Personal Protective Equipment »

Personal protective equipment (PPE) refers to the respiratory equipment, garments, and barrier materials used to protect rescuers and medical personnel from exposure to biological, chemical, and radioactive hazards.

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