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Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma (cont.)

What is the follow-up for primary open angle glaucoma?

Depending on the amount of optic nerve damage and the level of intraocular pressure control, people with primary open-angle glaucoma may need to be seen from every 2 months to yearly, even sooner if the pressures are not being adequately controlled.

Glaucoma should still be a concern in people who have elevated intraocular pressure with normal-looking optic nerves and normal visual field testing results or in people who have normal intraocular pressure with suspicious-looking optic nerves and visual field testing results. These people should be observed closely because they are at an increased risk for glaucoma.

Can I prevent primary open-angle glaucoma?

Primary open-angle glaucoma cannot be prevented, but through regular eye examinations with an ophthalmologist, its progression may be prevented.

What is the outlook for primary open-angle glaucoma?

The prognosis is generally good for people with primary open-angle glaucoma.

  • With follow-up care and compliance with medical treatment, most people with primary open-angle glaucoma retain useful vision throughout their lifetime.
  • With poor control of intraocular pressure, continuing changes to the optic nerve and the visual field occur.

Support Groups and Counseling for Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma

Educating people with primary open-angle glaucoma is essential for medical treatment to be successful. The person who understands the chronic (long-term), potentially progressive nature of glaucoma is more likely to comply with medical treatment.

Numerous handouts about glaucoma are available, two of which are listed below.

  • "Understanding and Living with Glaucoma: A Reference Guide for People with Glaucoma and Their Families," Glaucoma Research Foundation, 1-800-826-6693.
  • "Glaucoma Patient Resource: Living More Comfortably with Glaucoma," Prevent Blindness America, 1-800-331-2020.

Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma Pictures

Parts of the eye.
Parts of the eye.
Elevated eye pressure is caused by a build-up of fluid inside the eye because the drainage channels (trabecular meshwork) cannot drain it properly. Elevated eye pressure can cause optic nerve damage and vision loss.
Elevated eye pressure is caused by a build-up of fluid inside the eye because the drainage channels (trabecular meshwork) cannot drain it properly. Elevated eye pressure can cause optic nerve damage and vision loss.

Medically reviewed by William Baer, MD Board Certified Ophthalmology

REFERENCE:

Open-angle glaucoma: Epidemiology, clinical presentation, and diagnosis
UpToDate.com


Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 6/21/2016
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Read What Your Physician is Reading on Medscape

Glaucoma, Primary Open Angle »

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