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Prolapsed Bladder (cont.)

Prolapsed Bladder Treatment

A mild (grade 1) prolapsed bladder that produces no pain or discomfort usually requires no medical or surgical treatment. The doctor may recommend that a woman with a grade 1 prolapsed bladder should avoid heavy lifting or straining.

For cases that are more serious, the doctor takes into account various factors, such as the woman's age, general health, treatment preference, and the severity of the prolapsed bladder to determine which treatment is appropriate.

Nonsurgical treatments for a prolapsed bladder include the following:

  • Pessary: A pessary is a device that is placed within the vagina to hold the bladder in place. Pessaries must be removed and cleaned at regular intervals to prevent infection. Some pessaries are designed to allow the woman to do this herself. A doctor must remove and clean other types. Estrogen cream is commonly used along with a pessary to help prevent infection and vaginal wall erosion. Some women find that pessaries are uncomfortable or that they easily fall out.
  • Estrogen replacement therapy: Many women with prolapsed bladders may benefit from this therapy. Estrogen helps strengthen and maintain muscles in the vagina.
Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 5/30/2014
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