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Puncture Wound

Puncture Wound Overview

A puncture wound is caused by an object piercing the skin and creating a small hole. Some punctures are just on the surface. Others can be very deep, depending on the source and cause.

A puncture wound does not usually result in excessive bleeding. Usually, these wounds close fairly quickly without any intervention. Treatment may be necessary to prevent infection in some wounds. A puncture wound from a cause such as stepping on a nail can become infected because the object that caused the wound may carry bacteria or spores Clostridium spp that cause tetanus into the skin and tissue.

The subject of puncture wounds discussed here is meant to cover only the non-lifethreatening wounds, and is not an article that covers deep organ penetrating wounds seen with guns, large knives, lances or other similar objects.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 11/10/2014
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