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PUVA Therapy (cont.)

PUVA Therapy Treatment

About 60-90 minutes after ingesting a weight-adjusted dose the 8-MOP, the patient's skin is exposed to fluorescent bulbs emitting UVA light energy. The precise amount of light exposure is specified by a physician in units of energy. The length of time of the exposure depends on the intensity of light discharged by the bulbs, which can vary significantly depending on the age of the bulbs. Modern PUVA boxes usually contain a device that monitors the amount of light energy to which the patient is exposed and will automatically end the treatment when the correct dose is attained. Initially, exposures generally last about 30 seconds and later can extend to as long as 20 minutes, depending on the patient's pigmentation and tolerance as well as the intensity of the UVA source. Exposures ought to occur no more often than every 48 hours in order to avoid burning. Generally, the amount of light to which the patient is exposed is gradually increased over the course of 30 treatments. Ultimately, the number of treatment exposures will depend on the patient's response to treatments. If the patient's disease is confined to palms and soles, there are UVA sources designed to treat such areas.

The PUVA bath is more popular in Europe than the U.S. The patient is immersed in a bathtub containing water to which psoralen has been added. After a specified period, the patient is exposed to UVA. As in standard PUVA, the light exposure is gradually increased.

Although not strictly PUVA, there is a treatment termed "extracorporeal photophoresis" whereby a patient's white blood cells are extracted from the bloodstream and then exposed to psoralen, followed by UVA, and then added back into the bloodstream. This is a rather expensive treatment option and is only used under exceptional conditions in a few institutions.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 7/9/2014

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