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Repetitive Motion Injuries

Repetitive Motion Injuries Facts

Repetitive motion injuries are tissue injuries that occur as a result of repeated motions. They are among the most common injuries in the United States. All of these disorders are made worse by the strains of daily living.

Repetitive motion injuries make up more than half of all athletic-related injuries seen by doctors and result in huge losses in terms of cost to the workforce. Simple everyday actions, such as throwing a ball, scrubbing a floor, or jogging, can lead to this condition.

The most common types of repetitive motion injuries are tendinitis and bursitis, injuries to tendons and bursae, respectively. These disorders are difficult to distinguish and often coexist.

Tendinitis

  • A tendon is a white fibrous tissue that connects muscle to bone and allows for movement at all joints throughout the body. Because tendons must be able to bear all of the weight of the attached muscle, they are very strong.
  • Tendinitis is an inflammation of the tendon. (Whenever you see "-itis" at the end of a word, think "inflammation.")
  • Common sites of tendinitis include the shoulder, the biceps, and the elbow (such as tennis elbow).
  • Males are slightly more likely to have this disorder.
  • The inflammation of the tendon usually occurs at the site of insertion into bone.
  • Tendons run through a lubricating sheath where they connect into muscle, and this sheath also may become inflamed. This condition is known as tenosynovitis.
    • Tenosynovitis is almost identical to tendinitis because both have identical causes, symptoms, and treatment.
    • Tenosynovitis of the wrist may be involved in carpal tunnel syndrome, the most common compression nerve disorder, but this cause-and-effect relationship has never been proven.

Bursitis

  • Bursae are small pouches or sacs that are found over areas where friction may develop and serve to cushion or lubricate the area between tendon and bone.
  • Bursitis is inflammation of a bursa sac.
  • Over 150 bursae are in the body.
  • Most bursae are present at birth, but some come into existence in sites of repetitive pressure.
  • Common areas where bursitis can occur include the elbow, knee, and hip.
  • Different types of bursitis include traumatic, infectious, and gouty.
  • Traumatic bursitis is the type involved with repetitive motion injuries.
  • Traumatic bursitis is most common in people younger than 35 years of age.

Repetitive Motion Injuries Causes

Repetitive motion disorders develop because of microscopic tears in the tissue. When the body is unable to repair the tears in the tissue as fast as they are being made, inflammation occurs, leading to the sensation of pain.

Causes of repetitive motion injuries include the following:

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 4/22/2016
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Repetitive Motion Injuries - Symptoms

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Read What Your Physician is Reading on Medscape

Overuse Injury »

Overuse injuries, otherwise known as cumulative trauma disorders, are described as tissue damage that results fromrepetitive demand over the course of time.

Read More on Medscape Reference »


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