Viewer Comments: Roseola - Describe Your Experience

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Roseola - Describe Your Experience

Please describe your experience with roseola.

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Comment from: mammabear, 0-2 Female (Caregiver) Published: July 06

My 16 month old was diagnosed with roseola as well. He woke up in the night early one Thursday morning puking in bed. The next morning I had to go in and wake him and he was feverish around 101.6. I gave him Tylenol, and three hours later his fever spiked to 102.5. I called the doctor and told them the symptoms and we went in. They said it was most likely a viral infection and sent us home with antibiotics. He started those and still had fever, with added diarrhea. The next day he had no fever, then that evening (Friday) he spiked to 101.6 and before I knew it was up to 103.4. He was very lethargic, lying and moaning with his knees up under him. Then the next two days no fever, no eating, just milk and runny diapers. Then by Monday (a holiday no less) he had a full on rash all over his back and tummy, some on his face and legs. I called the doctor on Tuesday thinking it was an allergic reaction to the antibiotics. We went to the doctor and he was diagnosed. It was very scary and very unexpected. Unfortunately we exposed a lot of other children to this because it wasn't detected sooner.

Comment from: jill, 35-44 Female (Patient) Published: September 10

I am an adult who contracted Roseola or Fifth Disease from a child. The other name I was told was Parvo disease. It is very rare for adults to contract it, but if you have a low immune system (we just came back from vacation from Mexico) you can get it. Symptoms were very high fever, chills and body aches. Next came the rash throughout the body. It actually took an Infectious Disease MD to diagnose this. As a result of this, I had arthritis for about 6 months following and have never been a healthy individual since. Prior I was in great shape and only got the common cold every now and then.

Comment from: Texas , 0-2 Female (Caregiver) Published: September 10

Our daughter is 23-months-old and recently caught roseola. We had no idea she was even sick. She developed a high fever and had a febrile seizure. She had strep tests and urinary tests done, and they came back negative. That scared us even more because we had no idea what was causing her high fever, seizure, sluggishness, loss of appetite, and sleepiness. The development of a rash was the sign that lead the doctor to conclude roseola. This entire event was very frightening to everyone. We caution parents to check their children frequently, as the spike in fever with this disease happens quickly.

Comment from: rangersue, 0-2 Male (Caregiver) Published: February 03

My 23 month old son had a been diagnosed with roseola and for a few days before the rash appeared he had a high temperature, so I continuously had to bathe him in body temp water to bring his temp down and alternate panadol and nurofen, and made sure he rested a lot to help his tiredness.

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Patient Comments & Reviews

The eMedicineHealth doctors ask about Roseola:

Roseola - Treatment

What treatment did you experience with your roseola?



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