Font Size
A
A
A
...
7
...

Ruptured Tendon (cont.)

Ruptured Tendon Treatment

Patient Comments
  • Quadriceps
    • Partial tears may be treated without surgery by placing your straight leg in a cast or immobilizer for four to six weeks.
    • Once you are able to raise the affected leg without discomfort for 10 days, it is safe to slowly stop the immobilization.
  • Achilles tendon
    • Treatment without surgery involves placing your foot so that the sole of the foot is pointed downward for four to eight weeks.
    • This treatment has been advocated by some because it gives similar results to surgery in motion and strength. The problem with this treatment is that it has a high re-rupture rate. It may still be a reasonable option for those who are at increased operative risk because of age or medical problems or inactive people who may tolerate mild weakness in supporting weight on the ball of their foot (called plantarflexion).
  • Rotator cuff
    • The rotator cuff is unique because treatment without surgery is the treatment of choice in most tendon injuries. Most tendon injuries are long-term in nature, and many chronic rupture symptoms go away without surgery.
    • In contrast, acute rupture, as occurs with trauma, may or may not be repaired surgically depending on the severity of the tear.
    • If the tear is less than 50% of the cuff thickness or less than 1 cm in size, the dead tissue is removed arthroscopically. A small incision is made and a tool called an arthroscope is passed into the joint. Through it, the surgeon can see and remove dead tissue without actually cutting the joint open. The shoulder is then left to heal.
  • Biceps
    • Most surgeons prefer not to operate on a ruptured biceps tendon because function is not severely impaired with its rupture.
    • Studies suggest that after biceps rupture, only a small fraction of elbow flexion is lost and there is approximately 10%-20% strength reduction in supination (ability to turn the hand palm up). This is considered to be a moderate loss and not worth the risk of surgery in middle-aged and older people.
Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 11/5/2014

Must Read Articles Related to Ruptured Tendon

Achilles Tendon Rupture
Achilles Tendon Rupture The Achilles tendon, or tendon calcaneus, is a large ropelike band of fibrous tissue in the back of the ankle that connects the powerful calf muscles to the hee...learn more >>

Patient Comments & Reviews

The eMedicineHealth doctors ask about Ruptured Tendon:

Ruptured Tendon - Symptoms

What were the symptoms of your ruptured tendon?

Ruptured Tendon - Treatment

What treatment did you receive for your ruptured tendon?




Read What Your Physician is Reading on Medscape

Patellar Tendon Rupture »

The patellar tendon ruptures relatively infrequently.

Read More on Medscape Reference »


Medical Dictionary