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Cherry Angiomas


Cherry angiomas (ruby spots) are harmless clusters of dilated tiny blood vessels (capillaries) that become more common after age 30. The cause is unknown.

Bright, cherry red, smooth spots appear most often on the trunk and upper legs but may also be found on the face, neck, scalp, and arms. The size of the spots may vary from pinhead size to about the size of a pencil eraser. Although they are painless and harmless, cherry angiomas may bleed profusely if injured (until pressure is applied to stop the bleeding).

Cherry angiomas do not generally require any treatment. A doctor can remove them with surgery, freezing (cryotherapy), or burning (electrosurgery or cautery) if their appearance causes embarrassment or distress.

ByHealthwise Staff
Primary Medical ReviewerSarah Marshall, MD - Family Medicine
Specialist Medical ReviewerAlexander H. Murray, MD, FRCPC - Dermatology
Last RevisedMarch 28, 2011

eMedicineHealth Medical Reference from Healthwise

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