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Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (Patient) (cont.)

Treatment Options for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

A link to a list of current clinical trials is included for each treatment section. For some types or stages of cancer, there may not be any trials listed. Check with your doctor for clinical trials that are not listed here but may be right for you.

Indolent, Stage I and Contiguous Stage II Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Treatment of indolent, stage I and contiguous stage II adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma may include the following:

  • Radiation therapy directed at the area where cancer is found.
  • Watchful waiting.
  • Chemotherapy with radiation therapy.
  • Radiation therapy directed at the area where cancer is found and nearby lymph nodes.
  • Monoclonal antibody therapy with or without chemotherapy.
  • Treatments used for more advanced disease, in patients who can't be treated with radiation therapy.

Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with indolent, stage I adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma and indolent, contiguous stage II adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma. For more specific results, refine the search by using other search features, such as the location of the trial, the type of treatment, or the name of the drug. General information about clinical trials is available from the NCI Web site.

Aggressive, Stage I and Contiguous Stage II Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Treatment of aggressive, stage I and contiguous stage II adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma may include the following:

  • Combination chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy to areas where cancer is found.
  • A clinical trial of monoclonal antibody therapy and combination chemotherapy with steroids. Radiation therapy may also be given.

Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with aggressive, stage I adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma and aggressive, contiguous stage II adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma. For more specific results, refine the search by using other search features, such as the location of the trial, the type of treatment, or the name of the drug. General information about clinical trials is available from the NCI Web site.

Indolent, Noncontiguous Stage II/III/IV Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Treatment of indolent, noncontiguous stage II /III /IV adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma may include the following:

  • Watchful waiting for patients who do not have symptoms.
  • Chemotherapy with or without steroids.
  • Combination chemotherapy with steroids.
  • Monoclonal antibody therapy with or without chemotherapy.
  • Radiolabeled monoclonal antibody therapy.
  • Radiation therapy directed at the area where cancer is found and nearby lymph nodes, for patients who have stage II and stage III disease.
  • A clinical trial of chemotherapy with or without total-body irradiation (radiation therapy to the entire body) or radiolabeled monoclonal antibody therapy, followed by autologous or allogeneic stem cell transplant.
  • A clinical trial of chemotherapy with or without vaccine therapy.

Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with indolent, noncontiguous stage II adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma, indolent, stage III adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma and indolent, stage IV adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma. For more specific results, refine the search by using other search features, such as the location of the trial, the type of treatment, or the name of the drug. General information about clinical trials is available from the NCI Web site.

Aggressive, Noncontiguous Stage II/III/IV Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Treatment of aggressive, noncontiguous stage II /III /IV adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma may include the following:

  • Combination chemotherapy with radiation therapy or monoclonal antibody therapy.
  • Combination chemotherapy with CNS prophylaxis.
  • A clinical trial of autologous or allogeneic stem cell transplant for patients who are likely to relapse.

Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with aggressive, noncontiguous stage II adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma, aggressive, stage III adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma and aggressive, stage IV adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma. For more specific results, refine the search by using other search features, such as the location of the trial, the type of treatment, or the name of the drug. General information about clinical trials is available from the NCI Web site.

Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

Treatment of adult lymphoblastic lymphoma may include the following:

  • Combination chemotherapy and CNS prophylaxis.
  • A clinical trial of autologous or allogeneic stem cell transplant.

Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with adult lymphoblastic lymphoma. For more specific results, refine the search by using other search features, such as the location of the trial, the type of treatment, or the name of the drug. General information about clinical trials is available from the NCI Web site.

Diffuse Small Noncleaved Cell/Burkitt Lymphoma

Treatment of adult diffuse small noncleaved cell/Burkitt lymphoma may include the following:

  • Combination chemotherapy and CNS prophylaxis.
  • A clinical trial of combination chemotherapy.
  • A clinical trial of autologous or allogeneic stem cell transplant.

Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with adult Burkitt lymphoma. For more specific results, refine the search by using other search features, such as the location of the trial, the type of treatment, or the name of the drug. General information about clinical trials is available from the NCI Web site.

Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

Treatment of Waldenström macroglobulinemia may include the following:

  • Watchful waiting.
  • Plasmapheresis and chemotherapy.
  • Combinations of chemotherapy using one or more anticancer drugs and targeted therapy with a monoclonal antibody or a proteasome inhibitor.
  • Biologic therapy with interferon.
  • A clinical trial of stem cell transplant.

Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with Waldenström macroglobulinemia. For more specific results, refine the search by using other search features, such as the location of the trial, the type of treatment, or the name of the drug. General information about clinical trials is available from the NCI Web site.

Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Indolent, Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Treatment of indolent, recurrent adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma may include the following:

  • Chemotherapy with one or more drugs.
  • Radiation therapy.
  • Radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy as palliative therapy to relieve symptoms and improve quality of life.
  • Monoclonal antibody therapy.
  • A clinical trial of radiolabeled monoclonal antibody therapy.
  • A clinical trial of monoclonal antibody therapy as palliative therapy to relieve symptoms and improve quality of life.
  • A clinical trial of autologous or allogeneic stem cell transplant.

Treatment of indolent lymphoma that comes back as aggressive lymphoma may include the following:

  • A clinical trial of autologous or allogeneic stem cell transplant.
  • A clinical trial of combination chemotherapy followed by radiation therapy or stem cell transplant and radiation therapy.
  • A clinical trial of monoclonal antibody therapy.
  • A clinical trial of radiolabeled monoclonal antibody therapy.

Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with indolent, recurrent adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma. For more specific results, refine the search by using other search features, such as the location of the trial, the type of treatment, or the name of the drug. General information about clinical trials is available from the NCI Web site.

Aggressive, Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Treatment of aggressive, recurrent adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma may include the following:

  • Stem cell transplant.
  • Monoclonal antibody therapy with or without combination chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplant.
  • Radiolabeled monoclonal antibody therapy.
  • A clinical trial of autologous or allogeneic stem cell transplant.
  • A clinical trial of combination chemotherapy followed by radiation therapy or stem cell transplant and radiation therapy.

Treatment of aggressive lymphoma that comes back as indolent lymphoma may include the following:

  • Chemotherapy.
  • Palliative therapy with low-dose radiation therapy to relieve symptoms and improve quality of life.

Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with aggressive, recurrent adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma. For more specific results, refine the search by using other search features, such as the location of the trial, the type of treatment, or the name of the drug. General information about clinical trials is available from the NCI Web site.

Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma During Pregnancy

Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma During the First Trimester of Pregnancy

When aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma is diagnosed in the first trimester of pregnancy, medical oncologists may advise the patient to end her pregnancy so that treatment may begin. Treatment is usually chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy.

Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma During the Second and Third Trimesters of Pregnancy

When possible, treatment should delayed until after an early delivery, so that the anticancer drugs or radiation therapy will not affect the fetus. However, sometimes the cancer will need to be treated right away to increase the mother's chance of survival.

Indolent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma During Pregnancy

Women who have indolent (slow-growing) non-Hodgkin lymphoma can usually delay treatment with watchful waiting.

eMedicineHealth Public Information from the National Cancer Institute

This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http://cancer.gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER

This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.

Some material in CancerNet™ is from copyrighted publications of the respective copyright claimants. Users of CancerNet™ are referred to the publication data appearing in the bibliographic citations, as well as to the copyright notices appearing in the original publication, all of which are hereby incorporated by reference.



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