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Objects in the Nose (cont.)

Check Your Symptoms

Home Treatment

Removing an object from the nose

Follow these steps to remove an object from the nose:

  • Breathe through your mouth since the nose is blocked.
  • Pinch closed the side of the nose that doesn't have the object in it, and try to blow the object out of the blocked side. You may need to help a child pinch his or her nose.
  • Blow your nose forcefully several times. This may blow the object out of the nose.
  • If the object is partially out of the nose, you may be able to remove it. Stay still, and remove the object with your fingers or blunt-nosed tweezers. Be careful not to push the object farther into the nose. If a child resists or is not able to stay still, do not attempt to remove the object.
  • Some minor bleeding from your nose may occur after the object is removed. This usually is not serious and should stop after firmly pinching your nose shut for 10 minutes. See how to stop a nosebleedClick here to see an illustration..

You may be able to remove an object from a child's nose using the "kiss technique." Do not try this if you are uncomfortable with it, if your child says it hurts, or if your child becomes upset by your attempts:

  • Apply pressure to close the child's unaffected nostril. You can do this, or the child can help by holding his or her finger on the unaffected side of the nose.
  • Blow a puff of air into the child's mouth. The positive pressure of this puff will help push the object out of the child's nose. You may need to repeat this activity several times.

Home treatment after removing an object from the nose

Some tenderness and nasal stuffiness are common after removing an object from the nose. Home treatment will often relieve a tender, stuffy nose and make breathing easier.

  • Drink extra fluids for 2 to 3 days to keep mucus thin.
  • Breathe moist air from a humidifier, hot shower, or sink filled with hot water.
  • Increase the humidity in your home, especially in the bedroom.
  • Take an oral decongestant or use a decongestant nasal spray. But be careful with these medicines. They may not be safe for young children or for people who have certain health problems, so check the label first. If you do use these medicines, always follow the directions about how much to use based on age and weight. Oral decongestants are not as helpful as nasal sprays in children. Do not use a decongestant nasal spray for longer than 3 days. Overuse of decongestant sprays may cause the mucous membranes to swell up more than before (rebound effect). Avoid products containing antihistamines, which dry the nasal tissue.
  • Check the back of your throat for postnasal drip. If streaks of mucus appear, gargle with warm water to prevent a sore throat.
  • Elevate your head at night by sleeping on an extra pillow. This will decrease nasal stuffiness.
Medicine you can buy without a prescription
Try a nonprescription medicine to help treat your fever or pain:

Talk to your child's doctor before switching back and forth between doses of acetaminophen and ibuprofen. When you switch between two medicines, there is a chance your child will get too much medicine.

Safety tips
Be sure to follow these safety tips when you use a nonprescription medicine:
  • Carefully read and follow all directions on the medicine bottle and box.
  • Do not take more than the recommended dose.
  • Do not take a medicine if you have had an allergic reaction to it in the past.
  • If you have been told to avoid a medicine, call your doctor before you take it.
  • If you are or could be pregnant, do not take any medicine other than acetaminophen unless your doctor has told you to.
  • Do not give aspirin to anyone younger than age 20 unless your doctor tells you to.

Symptoms to watch for during home treatment

Call your doctor if one or more of the following symptoms occur during home treatment:

  • A nosebleed cannot be stopped with home treatment. See the topic Nosebleeds.
  • An infection develops.
  • Symptoms become more severe or more frequent.
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