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Rash, Age 11 and Younger (cont.)

Prevention

Several childhood diseases that cause a rash can be prevented through immunization. Immunizations help your child's immune system recognize and quickly attack a virus before it can cause a serious illness. Immunizations for chickenpox and for measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) can prevent these common rash-causing illnesses.

Other tips for preventing rashes include the following:

  • Dress your baby in as few clothes as possible during hot weather.
  • Breast-feed your child for at least the first 6 months, especially if either parent has a history of any allergy, including hay fever. Breast-fed children may develop fewer food allergies than those who are not breast-fed.
  • Do not bathe your child too often to prevent dry skin. Most children do not need daily bathing. Children with very dry skin may do better if they bathe once or twice a week.

Preparing For Your Appointment

To prepare for your appointment, see the topic Making the Most of Your Appointment.

You can help your doctor diagnose and treat your child's condition by being prepared to answer the following questions:

  • What is the history of the rash, including:
    • When did the rash start?
    • Where did the rash start?
    • Has the rash spread?
    • Has the rash changed?
    • Has anything made the rash better or worse?
  • Has your child had this rash before? If yes:
    • What were the circumstances?
    • When did he or she last have it?
    • How was it treated?
    • How long did it last?
  • What other symptoms has your child had? Symptoms may include itching, burning, stinging, tingling, numbness, pain, tenderness to the touch, fever, cold symptoms, or diarrhea.
  • Has your child been exposed to a contagious illness, such as measles, rubella, mumps, or chickenpox?
  • Have you recently used a new food, medicine, or product, such as soaps, detergents, shampoos, lotions, fabrics, new toys, or other object?
  • Has your child been exposed to poisonous plants. such as poison ivy, oak, or sumac?
  • Has your child had other health problems during the past 3 months?
  • Has your child recently traveled to a rural area or to another country?
  • Does anyone in your immediate family have a skin disorder or an allergy?
  • What home treatment measures have you tried? Did they help?
  • What nonprescription medicines have your tried? Did they help?
  • Does your child have any health risks?

eMedicineHealth Medical Reference from Healthwise

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