Font Size
A
A
A

Dietary Supplement


Dietary Supplement

A dietary supplement is a component found in foods (such as meats, grains, fruits, or vegetables) that can be singled out, extracted, and converted into another form, such as a pill or liquid.

Dietary supplements may be sold to the public without testing and approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Because of this, their effectiveness, purity, and quality are not known. For example, it is not required for manufacturers to detail how much of a product is the labeled supplement, such as melatonin, and how much of it is other substances or "fillers."

Credits

ByHealthwise Staff
Primary Medical ReviewerKathleen Romito, MD - Family Medicine
Specialist Medical ReviewerAlfred Lewy, MD, PhD - Psychiatry
Last RevisedSeptember 11, 2012

eMedicineHealth Medical Reference from Healthwise

This information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any warranty or liability for your use of this information. Your use of this information means that you agree to the Terms of Use. How this information was developed to help you make better health decisions.

To learn more visit Healthwise.org

© 1995-2014 Healthwise, Incorporated. Healthwise, Healthwise for every health decision, and the Healthwise logo are trademarks of Healthwise, Incorporated.



NIH talks about Ebola on WebMD


Medical Dictionary