Font Size
A
A
A

Myelogram


A myelogram uses X-rays (fluoroscopy) and a special dye called contrast material to make pictures of bones and nerves of the spine (spinal canal).

The spinal canal contains the spinal cord and nerve roots surrounded by a fluid-filled space called the subarachnoid space. For a myelogram, the dye (which contains iodine) is put into the subarachnoid space. X-ray pictures are taken as the dye moves into different areas of the subarachnoid space.

A myelogram can be used to find:

  • A blockage in the spinal canal that may be caused by a tumor or by a spinal disc that has ruptured (herniated).
  • Inflammation of the membrane (arachnoid membrane) that covers the brain and spinal cord.
  • Problems of the blood supply to the spinal cord.
  • Problems of the spinal cord and the nerves that branch off from the spinal cord.
ByHealthwise Staff
Primary Medical ReviewerAdam Husney, MD, MD - Family Medicine
Specialist Medical ReviewerHoward Schaff, MD - Diagnostic Radiology
Last RevisedJuly 28, 2011

eMedicineHealth Medical Reference from Healthwise

This information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any warranty or liability for your use of this information. Your use of this information means that you agree to the Terms of Use. How this information was developed to help you make better health decisions.

To learn more visit Healthwise.org

© 1995-2014 Healthwise, Incorporated. Healthwise, Healthwise for every health decision, and the Healthwise logo are trademarks of Healthwise, Incorporated.



NIH talks about Ebola on WebMD


Medical Dictionary