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Presbycusis (Age-Related Hearing Loss)


Age-related hearing loss (presbycusis) is a progressive loss of the ability to hear high frequencies, which occurs as people get older. The primary symptom is problems understanding speech, especially in the presence of background noise.

It is unknown whether a specific cause, such as long-term exposure to excessive noise, contributes to age-related hearing loss. But it does appear to be a genetic condition, as it tends to occur in families.

The number of nerve cells in the inner ear may begin to decline as early as age 30 or 40, although hearing loss rarely becomes noticeable before age 55. But hearing loss is not necessarily an inevitable part of aging. Many people in their 80s do not have hearing loss.

There is no known cure for age-related hearing loss. Treatment is focused on improving function, such as by using hearing aids.

ByHealthwise Staff
Primary Medical ReviewerWilliam H. Blahd, Jr., MD, FACEP - Emergency Medicine
Specialist Medical ReviewerCharles M. Myer, III, MD - Otolaryngology
Last RevisedApril 8, 2013

eMedicineHealth Medical Reference from Healthwise

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