Font Size
A
A
A

Titers


Some lab tests (especially antibody and antigen tests) report results in titers. A titer is a measure of how much the sample can be diluted before the antibodies or antigens can no longer be detected.

A titer of 1 to 8 (1:8) means that antibodies or antigens can still be found when 1 part of the blood sample is diluted by 8 parts of a salt solution (saline), but they can no longer be found at a dilution of 1 to 16 (1:16). A larger second number means there are more antibodies or antigens in the sample. So a titer of 1 to 128 (1:128) means more antibodies or antigens in the sample than a titer of 1 to 32 (1:32).

ByHealthwise Staff
Primary Medical ReviewerAnne C. Poinier, MD - Internal Medicine
Specialist Medical ReviewerThomas M. Bailey, MD - Family Medicine
Last RevisedMay 6, 2011

eMedicineHealth Medical Reference from Healthwise

This information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any warranty or liability for your use of this information. Your use of this information means that you agree to the Terms of Use. How this information was developed to help you make better health decisions.

To learn more visit Healthwise.org

© 1995-2012 Healthwise, Incorporated. Healthwise, Healthwise for every health decision, and the Healthwise logo are trademarks of Healthwise, Incorporated.






Medical Dictionary