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Sepsis (Blood Infection) (cont.)

What Are Sepsis Symptoms and Signs?

Patient Comments
  • If a person has sepsis, they often will have fever. Sometimes, though, the body temperature may be normal or even low.
  • The individual may also have chills and severe shaking.
  • The heart may be beating very fast, and breathing may be rapid. Low blood pressure is often observed in septic patients.
  • Confusion, disorientation, and agitation may be seen as well as dizziness.
  • Decreased urination (due to poor kidney perfusion or dehydration)
  • Some patients who have sepsis develop a rash on their skin. The rash may be a reddish discoloration or small dark red dots seen throughout the body.
  • Those with sepsis may also develop pain in the joints of the wrists, elbows, back, hips, knees, and ankles.
Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 1/15/2016

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The eMedicineHealth doctors ask about Sepsis:

Sepsis (Blood Infection) - Treatments

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Sepsis (Blood Infection) - Causes

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Sepsis - Symptoms and Signs

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Read What Your Physician is Reading on Medscape

Sepsis, Bacterial »

Sepsis is a clinical term used to describe symptomatic bacteremia, with or without organ dysfunction.

Read More on Medscape Reference »


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