Font Size
A
A
A

Sepsis (Blood Infection) (cont.)

Is It Possible to Prevent Sepsis?

  • The risk of sepsis can be reduced in children by following recommended immunization schedules.
  • Hospital related infections leading to sepsis can be decreased by strictly following hand washing and hygiene protocols.

Pictures of Sepsis

Cellulitis, an infection of the skin, may lead to sepsis, particularly in elderly people and those with diabetes or other illnesses that alter the immune system.
Cellulitis, an infection of the skin, may lead to sepsis, particularly in elderly people and those with diabetes or other illnesses that alter the immune system.

This rash, showing petechia and purpura, may be a sign of bacteria in the bloodstream (bacteremia).
This rash, showing petechia and purpura, may be a sign of bacteria in the bloodstream (bacteremia).

REFERENCES:

Donovan, C., and J. Blewitt. "An Overview of Meningitis and Meningococcal Septicaemia." Emerg Nurse. 17.7 Nov. 2009: 30-6; quiz 37.

Sharma, Sat, and Eschun, Gregg. “Multisystem Organ Failure of Sepsis.” eMedicine. Apr. 28, 2009. <http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/169640-overview>.


Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 1/15/2016

Must Read Articles Related to Sepsis (Blood Infection)

Cellulitis
Cellulitis Cellulitis is a bacterial infection of the skin and soft tissues that causes swelling, redness, tenderness and warmth. Treatment will involve antibiotics. Sever...learn more >>
Fever (in Adults)
Fever in Adults A fever is a body temperature of 100.4 F or greater. A fever/...learn more >>

Patient Comments & Reviews

The eMedicineHealth doctors ask about Sepsis:

Sepsis (Blood Infection) - Treatments

How was your sepsis treated?

Sepsis (Blood Infection) - Causes

What was the cause of your sepsis (blood infection)?

Sepsis - Symptoms and Signs

What were your sepsis symptoms and signs?


Read What Your Physician is Reading on Medscape

Sepsis, Bacterial »

Sepsis is a clinical term used to describe symptomatic bacteremia, with or without organ dysfunction.

Read More on Medscape Reference »


Medical Dictionary