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Medications and Drugs

Brand Names: Meridia

Generic Name: sibutramine (Pronunciation: si BUE tra meen)

What is sibutramine (Meridia)?

Sibutramine was withdrawn from the U.S. market in October 2010.

Sibutramine affects chemicals in the brain that affect weight maintenance.

Sibutramine is used together with diet and exercise to treat obesity that may be related to diabetes, high cholesterol, or high blood pressure.

Sibutramine may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Meridia 10 mg

blue/white, imprinted with MERIDIA, 10

What are the possible side effects of sibutramine (Meridia)?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using sibutramine and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

  • fast, pounding, or uneven heartbeats;
  • new or worsening shortness of breath;
  • agitation, hallucinations, fever, tremor, overactive reflexes, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, loss of coordination, dilated pupils;
  • very stiff (rigid) muscles, high fever, sweating, confusion, feeling like you might pass out;
  • easy bruising or bleeding (nosebleeds, bleeding gums, or any bleeding that will not stop);
  • dangerously high blood pressure (severe headache, blurred vision, buzzing in your ears, anxiety, seizure);
  • chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, general ill feeling; or
  • sudden numbness or weakness (especially on one side of the body), problems with vision, speech, or balance.

Less serious side effects may include:

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is the most important information I should know about sibutramine (Meridia)?

Sibutramine was withdrawn from the U.S. market in October 2010.

Do not use sibutramine if you have taken an MAO inhibitor such as furazolidone (Furoxone), isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the last 14 days. Serious, life threatening side effects can occur if you use sibutramine before the MAO inhibitor has cleared from your body.

You should not take sibutramine if you are allergic to it, or if you have severe or uncontrolled high blood pressure, an eating disorder (anorexia or bulimia), if you are taking stimulant diet pills, or if you have a history of coronary artery disease, stroke, or heart disease.

Before taking sibutramine, tell your doctor if you have glaucoma, high blood pressure, liver or kidney disease, depression, underactive thyroid, seizures, a bleeding disorder, a history of gallstones, or if you are older than 65 or younger than 16.

Tell your doctor about all prescription and over-the-counter medications you use, especially antidepressants, cold or allergy medication, narcotic pain medicine, or migraine headache medicines.

Tell your doctor if you do not lose at least 4 pounds after taking the medication for 4 weeks along with a low calorie diet.



Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

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