Font Size
A
A
A
...
10
...

Spider Bite: Brown Recluse Spider Bite (cont.)

Brown Recluse Spider Bite Prognosis

The majority of brown recluse bites cause little permanent skin damage, although, in some cases, moderate to severe tissue destruction is possible. The full extent of damage to tissues is not known for days. It may take many months for the wound to completely heal.

  • Brown recluse bites are noted for somewhat slow development of signs and symptoms, and often take up to 12 hours to reveal themselves. Necrosis of skin (death of skin), if it occurs, does so in the first 96 hours. Bites older than this that do not display tissue death have not been reported to worsen.
  • Necrotic lesions can be difficult to manage, and early surgery to remove dead tissue has not been shown to improve outcomes. Necrotic lesions with careful cleaning are allowed to mature for weeks until spreading stops and healing appears to begin. Then a wide area of tissue around the wound is removed and skin grafting may be done once all evidence of skin necrosis has subsided.

Must Read Articles Related to Spider Bite: Brown Recluse Spider Bite

Black Widow and Brown Recluse Spider Bite
Wilderness: Black Widow and Recluse Spider Bite Black widow spider and brown recluse spider bites in the wilderness present a medical emergency. If bitten by either of these spiders, seek medical attention im...learn more >>

Patient Comments & Reviews

The eMedicineHealth doctors ask about Brown Recluse Spider Bite:

Brown Recluse Spider Bite - Treatment

What was the treatment for your brown recluse spider bite?

Brown Recluse Spider Bite - Experience

What was your experience with brown recluse spider bite?

Brown Recluse Spider Bite - Symptoms

What symptoms did you experience with your brown recluse spider bite?





Read What Your Physician is Reading on Medscape

Spider Envenomations: Brown Recluse »

In the United States, reports of severe envenomations by brown spiders began to appear in the late 1800s, and today, in endemic areas, brown spiders continue to be of significant clinical concern.

Read More on Medscape Reference »


Medical Dictionary