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Subconjunctival Hemorrhage (Bleeding in Eye) (cont.)

Subconjunctival Hemorrhage Causes

Patient Comments

Most subconjunctival hemorrhages are spontaneous without an obvious cause for this bleeding from the conjunctival vessels. Often, a person may discover a subconjunctival hemorrhage on awakening and looking in the mirror. Most spontaneous subconjunctival hemorrhages are first noticed by another person seeing a red spot on your eye.

The following can occasionally result in a spontaneous subconjunctival hemorrhage:

  • sneezing,
  • coughing,
  • straining/vomiting,
  • eye rubbing,
  • trauma (injury),
  • high blood pressure,
  • bleeding disorder, or
  • a medical disorder causing bleeding or inhibiting normal clotting.

Subconjunctival hemorrhage can also be non-spontaneous and result from a severe eye infection, trauma to the head or eye, or after eye or eyelid surgery.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 4/9/2014

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Patient Comments & Reviews

The eMedicineHealth doctors ask about Subconjunctival Hemorrhage (Bleeding in Eye):

Bleeding in Eye - Treatment

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Subconjunctival Hemorrhage - Patient Experience

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Read What Your Physician is Reading on Medscape

Subconjunctival Hemorrhage »

Subconjunctival hemorrhage is defined as blood between the conjunctiva and the sclera, and it is involved in the differential diagnosis of a red eye.

Read More on Medscape Reference »


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