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Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) (cont.)

Clinical Features of SIDS

Sudden infant death syndrome remains an unpredictable, unpreventable, and largely inexplicable tragedy. The baby is seemingly healthy without any sign of distress or significant illness prior to the incident.

  • Death occurs rapidly while the infant is sleeping.


  • Typically, it is a silent event. The baby does not cry.


  • The infant usually appears to be well developed, well nourished, and is generally felt to be in good health prior to death. Minor upper respiratory or gastrointestinal symptoms are not uncommon in the last two weeks preceding SIDS.
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Sudden Infant Death Syndrome »

Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is defined as the sudden death of an infant younger than 1 year that remains unexplained after a thorough case investigation, including the performance of a complete autopsy, examination of the scene of death, and review of the clinical history.

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