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Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) Syndrome (cont.)

When to Seek Medical Care

Occasional pain in the jaw joint or chewing muscles is common and may not be a cause for concern. See a doctor if your pain is severe or if it does not go away. Treatment for TMJ syndrome ideally should begin when it is in early stages. The doctor can explain the functioning of the joints and how to avoid any action or habit (such as chewing gum) that might aggravate the joint or facial pain.

If your jaw is locked open or closed, go to a hospital's emergency department.

  • The open locked jaw is treated by sedating you to a comfortable level. Then the mandible is held with the thumbs while the lower jaw is pushed downward, forward, and backward.
  • The closed locked jaw is treated by sedating you until you are completely relaxed. Then the mandible is gently manipulated until the mouth opens.
Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 5/5/2014

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Read What Your Physician is Reading on Medscape

Temporomandibular Joint Syndrome »

TMJ, or temporal mandibular joint, is the synovial joint that connects the jaw to the skull.

Read More on Medscape Reference »


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